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submitted 5 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

A candidate in the upcoming Westminster elections has been jailed after refusing to pay a fine.

Dr Anne McCloskey, 67, appeared at Londonderry Magistrates' Court in connection with an unpaid Covid fine of £255.

She was given an immediate warrant to pay the amount or go to prison for 14 days.

Dr McCloskey, of Chapel Road in Derry, is running as an independent in Foyle in the UK general election.

...

Dr McCloskey accused court officials of "fraud" by entering a plea of not guilty for her in relation to the original offences.

The defendant went on to say she had been arrested on the foot of "a fake entity" - namely the Director of Public Prosecution who she said did "not exist in law or statute".

As the defendant continued to speak, Judge McElholm muted her microphone and said she was talking "nonsense".

He said he had never met the DPP personally but was pretty sure he existed.

The judge said he had given Dr McCloskey an opportunity but she had gone off on "a diatribe".

...

Dr McCloskey was fined for breaching Covid regulations while speaking at an anti-lockdown rally in November 2020 in Derry.

She had been suspended from practising as a GP for six months from 24 October 2023 over comments about the Covid-19 vaccination.

She had expressed concerns in a social media video about young people taking Covid jabs, in August 2021.

She lost an appeal against that decision in January 2024.

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submitted 5 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Nigel Farage’s Reform party has overtaken the Conservatives in a poll for the first time in a national poll.

The Tories were pushed into third in the survey, by pollsters YouGov one point behind Reform on 18 percent to 19 percent

The findings will come as a body blow to Rishi Sunak after a disastrous election campaign and risks triggering panic among many Tory MPs.

As the TV showdown opened he told millions of viewers “we are now the opposition to Labour”.

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The poll found support for Reform had increased by two points to 19 per cent while the Tories were unchanged on 18 per cent.

At the end of the debate, Mr Farage said to Ms Mordaunt: “A vote for you is actually now a vote for Labour.”

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Many Tories now will be wondering if this was a freak poll or if more with Reform going further in front are set to be unleashed over the last three weeks of the election campaign. If Reform builds up a lead of five or more points it could see the world’s oldest political party go into a meltdown and face a wipeout.

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submitted 20 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 18 hours ago* (last edited 18 hours ago) by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

The 2024 Labour Manifesto is now online!

I am genuinely excited by loads of it, especially the green policies and the expansion of workers' rights, but probably the most important part of it is the stuff aimed at economic growth.

What do you think? Love it? Hate it? Inspired to volunteer? Some more sensible, moderate emotion?

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submitted 22 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 15 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Archive/No Paywall

A Labour manifesto that brings the railways into public ownership, strengthens workers’ rights and removes tax exemptions for private schools (all policies from 2017 and 2019 manifestos) should be universally welcomed.

But what lies beneath is far more sinister. The 2024 Labour manifesto bakes in austerity for our public services. By ruling out redistributive taxation, it de facto accepts existing spending plans that the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) says mean cuts to unprotected departments of between 1.9 per cent and 3.5 per cent per year. Austerity baked in.
[…]
The IFS has said there is a “conspiracy of silence” between the two major parties about the scale of cuts that is baked into the current economic plans. The Resolution Foundation estimates that implies upwards of £19bn of cuts in non-protected departments.

Nothing in Labour’s manifesto changes that analysis. The tax changes Labour has announced (mostly reforming non-dom status and removing tax breaks for private schools) amount to around £7bn in extra revenue – and that has already been earmarked […]

Across the public sector, from nursing to care workers, from teachers to junior doctors, there is a recruitment and retention crisis. Unless you restore public sector pay, you will not solve those staffing shortages, or tackle the NHS backlogs. It’s also not clear from the manifesto where any additional funding would come from to fund the private sector operations that shadow Health Secretary Wes Streeting has promised, leaving the worrying conclusion that they may come out of existing NHS budgets.

[…] Both councils and universities need an injection of cash, or we will all lose out. The courts have massive backlogs and child poverty has risen to 4.3 million due to decades of benefit cuts – none of which are being reversed by Labour’s new manifesto.
[…]
But as Labour has become ever more reliant on wealthy and corporate donors, so it seems their tax policy has been diluted. He who pays the piper calls the tune.

If you want a snappy summary of Keir Starmer’s “changed Labour Party”, it was pithily provided by Kay Burley earlier this year: “Labour’s happy to cap child benefit, but not bankers’ bonuses”.

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submitted 21 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 19 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 22 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 21 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 1 day ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

HOW IS HE SO BAD AT THIS?

He should've said, 'Look, I was very fortunate growing up, there's no point denying that. What I want is for every child to have the opportunities I had, that's why our policy is to blah, blah first-time buyers blah tax, etc., unlike Labour who want blah VAT on private schools, blah'.

Instead, he gets immediately rattled and starts gibbering at the first follow-up question. He is just the worst.

By the way, this is the interview he thought was so important he had to run away from Normandy to do it. Apparently, it wasn't important enough for him to do any prep.

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submitted 1 day ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 1 day ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

I don't see one already up so feel free to shit post here.

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submitted 1 day ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

... But great news for Britain!

Hartlepool is on track to lurch back to Labour in the election. Reform UK is in second spot

Came across this via LabourList, so giving them a shout, too.

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submitted 2 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Great! /s

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submitted 2 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 1 day ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 1 day ago* (last edited 1 day ago) by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

cross-posted from: https://feddit.uk/post/13249358

  1. More tax, more spend
  2. Build, build, build
  3. Tackling the cost of living
  4. A green society
  5. We’re sober and sensible, really

edit: Here it is

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submitted 2 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 2 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 2 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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submitted 2 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

A record number of candidates are standing in this year's general election.

More than 4,500 candidates are standing to be elected in the 650 constituencies across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

It means that the election, on 4 July, sees a 35.7% increase on the 2019 poll.

The increase primarily comes from Reform UK ending its promise not to stand against Conservatives, the Green Party standing more candidates and the Workers Party of Britain entering its first general election.

There has also been a large spike in the number of independent and smaller party candidates standing.

Matthew Flinders, professor of politics at Sheffield University, said an increase in candidates means this election means the next government will see "more marginals" and "more fluidity between elections".

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submitted 2 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Who is this supposed to endear him to?

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submitted 2 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Harper said the vote was:

a now-or-never opportunity to remove the Tories from power. Only Labour is able to do this across the UK and only Labour has a plan to halt environmental destruction.

I couldn't have put it better.

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submitted 2 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
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UK Politics

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